Meditation has not always been as popular, nor as well accepted as it is now. Even today, there are plenty of naysayers and skeptics who might wonder why anyone would want to ‘waste’ time with such a peculiar practice.  And although meditation and mindfulness are increasingly researched and recommended by doctors and psychologists, (and written about in everything from Time to Wired Magazine) you might still be wondering how it could be of any use to you.

Of course, meditation is not a panacea for every conceivable difficulty or ailment; and for some, it just may not appeal at all. On the other hand, both the anecdotal evidence of meditators and the empirical evidence of researchers indicates that there are many benefits to be accrued from this innocuously simple practice.

While some of the more outlandish claims should be regarded with skepticism, there is no doubt that meditation can, and will:

  • enable you to relax your body, at will, to a degree perhaps unfamiliar since childhood
  • help you to identify and better manage stress
  • gradually allow you to find solace from the incessant chatter of an over-active mind
  • help you to develop the ability to tolerate strong emotions without being overwhelmed by them
  • provide you with a tool for deep rest, rejuvenation and re-energizing
  • provide better conditions for robust health and healing; both physical and mental
  • help you to manage all types of pain
  • give you effective tools for managing insomnia

If you have a more specific need or purpose, meditation is still likely to be useful; if not as a treatment, then at least as an adjunct to other forms of training, therapy or medication. For more information, refer to this article on the benefits of meditation by Lorin Roche Ph.D.,

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